creativity on the hook

From A Slow Learner’s Bill of Rights.

You have the right

  • To work with people who find you and your visions fascinating
  • To work with people who are fascinated by your brilliant visions and will hold you accountable to do what you said you would do

Sunday is usually a lazy sort of day. But out of the blue, I receive an email invite from Tricia Postle :

I had an idea for a “COTH” group – creativity-on-the-hook! because the goal is to get those creative impulses into the boat, on the grill, and served with lemon slices for general consumption. Hedonistic enough?
I’m thinking, meeting every two weeks for a 90 minute session.
15 m check-in/catchup, wine/whine as necessary
15 m outline of what’s going on with one person’s projects
15 m feedback, priority-setting
30 m ditto above
15 m what are we on the hook for, before next meeting
Sessions after that would include a review of what we did and didn’t do, with a solve-the-problem, not-the-blame approach.

Normally these kinds of invitations require time-consuming back-and-forth negotiations of  location and calendar,  and sometimes never grow beyond idea phase. But more and more often I’m finding that Slow Learning is Immediate. Within an hour we were drinking tea, dreaming and scheming and testing Tricia’s COTH process with each other.

We both came away from the afternoon with a list of goals that, with each other’s help, we had refined and clarified into actionable items. (Among other things, I will refine my elevator speech about Slow Learning, and she will start outfitting her  Troubadour Hope Chest)  In a month we’ll meet again, and see what we’ve accomplished.

Tricia reminded me that a Slow Learner is a whole person, not just a person with goals and a to-do list. So we talked about taking care of ourselves, of considering work, relationship, physical and emotional health as part of the COTH process.

Since I have a tendency to beat myself up when I don’t accomplish what I set out to do, I find Tricia’s “solve the problem, not the blame” philosophy confronting and refreshing.

What are Slow Learning friends for?

a time to incubate and a time to hatch

As mentioned in A Slow Learner’s Bill of Rights, we have the right

38. To incubate and hibernate
39. To be in action and produce measurable concrete results
40. To learn how to discern between the time for #38 and #39
41. To work with people who have some distance and perspective and can help you with #40

We’ve taken our time. We’ve dreamed big. We’ve planned and schemed. Now is the time take action.  Thank you Dexter for inspiring us all.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XGcumgYoBVM&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&version=3]

a slow learner’s bill of rights (draft 1.0)

You have the right*

To learn

  1. To learn about how you learn
  2. To learn as slow and as fast as you choose
  3. To rearrange your room (house, garage, life) to make room for your learning
  4. To claim space, time, and money for your own learning
  5. To learn from people who fascinate you
  6. To learn beyond school
  7. To be challenged
  8. To learn from people who fascinate you
  9. To ask for and to receive help
  10. To learn in quiet and without interruption with serious intent
  11. To learn in noise and mess with playful possibility
  12. To make a mess and not have to clean up right away
  13. To learn what is valuable and to value your learning
  14. To choose your own team of teachers, coaches, mentors, advisors
  15. To work with people who find you and your visions fascinating
  16. To work with people who are fascinated by your brilliant visions and will hold you accountable to do what you said you would do
  17. To be witnessed
  18. To focus
  19. To make a difference
  20. To make media
  21. To invent media
  22. To study with your heroes
  23. To experiment
  24. To experience
  25. To test your limits
  26. To contribute
  27. To change the world
  28. To create your own curriculum and to stick with it
  29. To change your mind when it doesn’t work and start again
  30. To study in community both near and distant, familiar and exotic
  31. To savor the erotic nature of learning
  32. To learn from mistakes
  33. To join the community of practice of your choice
  34. To join the professional network of your choice as a contributor
  35. To make learning a priority in your life
  36. To pay your dues
  37. To incubate and hibernate
  38. To be in action and produce measurable concrete results
  39. To learn how to discern between the time for #38 and #39
  40. To work with people who have some distance and perspective and can help you with #40
  41. To dabble
  42. To dive in deep
  43. To cross disciplines
  44. To learn what no one can teach
  45. To learn so that you might teach others to learn
  46. To learn new ways of learning that work for you
  47. To practice

* I know this list is incomplete and much is redundant. Comment, and help make it more better.

slow learning in a nutshell

Phyllis Turner responded to my call for Slow learners with this:

I am intrigued by the idea, it is almost like a micro-version of the culture/philosophy of Antioch. Create your own curriculum, find your own teacher, be your own teacher, along with a group of others doing the same – without the $30,000 price tag.